Saturday, March 14, 2020

Free Essays on The Religious Systems Of The Huron And Cheyenne

The Religious Systems of the Huron and Cheyenne The price of religion to a human in one of the most important factors in one’s life, as well is their own being. People practice religion for several reasons, throughout the world it is practiced as it being part of their heritage. However many people seek religion for the feeling of security. There are hundreds of different cultures throughout the world, some who believe in everything including their health is left up to the Gods to heal, while others believe in praying for the advanced technology of today may help them to survive. This to them is their feeling of security, whether it is seen different in someone else’s opinion because to them it is what has them to be the person they are. The religious systems of the Huron and the Cheyenne vastly different, however; they did have some similarities. This can be seen through their worldviews of the supernatural universe, the role of shaman in the society, and their attitudes towards death. First, the Huron and the Cheyenne worldviews of the universe differed but also had some similarities. To start, the Huron shared a set of believes, however they were open to innovation and borrowing of religious beliefs from neighboring tribes. The Huron’s people were free to interpret and practice religion as he as she wished, with in the constraints of public opinion. The Huron did not build and special buildings or shrines for religious purposes or ceremonies. The Huron transmitted specialized knowledge of religious beliefs through elderly men. At major feasts these men would stand up and recite their stories. In the Huron religion everything including man made objects had souls. Humans had two souls. The onnhekwi, or life soul animated the body and made each part function. This soul was as large as the body or organ and had the same shape. These souls accounted for actions such as breathing, heart rate, and all bodily motion. Eac... Free Essays on The Religious Systems Of The Huron And Cheyenne Free Essays on The Religious Systems Of The Huron And Cheyenne The Religious Systems of the Huron and Cheyenne The price of religion to a human in one of the most important factors in one’s life, as well is their own being. People practice religion for several reasons, throughout the world it is practiced as it being part of their heritage. However many people seek religion for the feeling of security. There are hundreds of different cultures throughout the world, some who believe in everything including their health is left up to the Gods to heal, while others believe in praying for the advanced technology of today may help them to survive. This to them is their feeling of security, whether it is seen different in someone else’s opinion because to them it is what has them to be the person they are. The religious systems of the Huron and the Cheyenne vastly different, however; they did have some similarities. This can be seen through their worldviews of the supernatural universe, the role of shaman in the society, and their attitudes towards death. First, the Huron and the Cheyenne worldviews of the universe differed but also had some similarities. To start, the Huron shared a set of believes, however they were open to innovation and borrowing of religious beliefs from neighboring tribes. The Huron’s people were free to interpret and practice religion as he as she wished, with in the constraints of public opinion. The Huron did not build and special buildings or shrines for religious purposes or ceremonies. The Huron transmitted specialized knowledge of religious beliefs through elderly men. At major feasts these men would stand up and recite their stories. In the Huron religion everything including man made objects had souls. Humans had two souls. The onnhekwi, or life soul animated the body and made each part function. This soul was as large as the body or organ and had the same shape. These souls accounted for actions such as breathing, heart rate, and all bodily motion. Eac...

Wednesday, February 26, 2020

The Codex Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

The Codex - Essay Example By describing brief history of different codices, an attempt has been made to highlight the importance of codex history. Such history will not only provide a better understanding of past work but it will also provide an understanding of the development of ideas as well as a base for future research. Today’s physical form of the book took a series of severe changes of about 5000 years. However, its most popular format has been in the shape of codex i.e. a collection of bounded and covered pages. Just after few hundred years of its creation, the codex book gained a distinct domination over the past well-liked format of papyrus scroll. One important factor that brought the supremacy of codex on scroll was the effective role of Christianity. Christian church took revolutionary steps to distinguish the writings of its holy books from the Jewish influence. They implemented several unique codex formats for its scriptures. Consequently, Christianity spread throughout the history and its codex formats as well. The Romans civilization is considered as the pioneer that used the codices (plural of codex) as personal notebooks e.g. their use in the form of mail etc. For this purpose they used wax-covered pills of wood and stylus. These codices were ephemeral and informal because after using once, they were washed out for their use again. In the history, the first occurrence of the use of the codex is the later part of 1st century when The Romans used the codex for the circulation of educational works. At that time, literary works were carried out through scrolls media which remained dominantly effective till the 4th century. Later on Chinese remained in practice in using of scroll for their literary purposes. Christians also widely used the papyrus codex during 2nd century. Evidences revealed that the most primitive surviving fragments from codices came from Egypt during the 1st and 2nd century (Turner, 1977 and Roberts & Skeat, 1983). An example of egypt

Monday, February 10, 2020

The Models or Schools Of Thought to the Management of Business Essay

The Models or Schools Of Thought to the Management of Business Strategy - Essay Example The present research has identified that the strategic models during the 1980s were predominantly premised upon factors external to the organization. They pertained to elements in the business environment which shaped the manner in which the corporation responded. The advantage of these strategies is that they are market-oriented and therefore are keen to capture opportunities and avoid threats; however, they largely ignore or overlook the internal resources and capabilities of the company and its strengths and weaknesses. As a result, the strategic plans are not always feasible for the company to implement, or the firm may be ill-equipped or their personnel ill-trained to properly execute it.   Porter’s model focuses on five forces that are external to the firm but internal to the industry to which it belongs. The stronger these forces are, the more limited a firm is in building profits; on the other, weak forces indicate that there are more opportunities to earn profits. O ver time, the strength of each of the forces may change, together with changing industry conditions. It is the manager’s task to take cognizance of these risks and opportunities and to formulate an appropriate strategy in response to these forces. Each of the generic strategies adopts a fundamentally different approach in â€Å"creating, sustaining, and combining a firm’s competitive advantage† and deciding on what its specific target shall be. The clear-cut distinctions the model makes among the strategies tend to be simplistic and misleading because a cost leader cannot ignore the basis of differentiation – that is, the cost leader must at least achieve parity or proximity on the basis of differentiation as its competitors for it to realize an advantage over them in cost. Conversely, the firm relying on differentiation must attain a cost structure at parity or proximity to its competitors, by reigning in costs that do not impact on differentiation.

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Cathay Pacific Essay Example for Free

Cathay Pacific Essay HistoryIn 1946 two ex air force pilots Roy Farrell and Sydney de Kantzow founded Cathay Pacific in Hong Kong. Both of them contributed HK$1 so that their new found airline could be registered. Even though at first it was based in Shanghai, both founders shifted to Hong Kong where they established Cathay Pacific. According to Gavin (1988) 1960 was a good and prosperous year for the airline as they bought their rivals Hong Kong Airways. By 1964 it had more then a million customers. The and by 1967 they were unlimited customers. In the same era it also bought its first jet engined aircraft. It was the Convair 880. It seemed as if here was success after success because soon after buying the new aircraft they introduced their international flights. Cathay Pacific seemed to be soaring high as in 1999; a new head office was established in Hong Kong International Airport. They called it the Cathay City. Till today Cathay Pacific holds his head up high when it comes to quality service and success in the airline industry (Ashok 2003 p110)Part 2SuccessCathays success has based on her wide-range of service all around the world especially in Asia, and modern management orientation and employees from over ten countries. In every country their service is considered as quality service as they always make the customers journey pleasant one. The reason why Cathaywas so successful is that it has always believed in quality customer care and new strategies. They know what those successful in the past may not make them successful again as the world keeps changing. They believe that is their employees and human resource which make them successful. Their success lies in the airlines corporate philosophy which is service straight from the heart and determination for constant improvement (Chan 2000 p473). They believe that they have to deliver the best service and fulfil all the requirements of the passengers so that they have a pleasant journey Part 3 Company StructureLike in most organizations here too top management, technical support staff , middle management, administrative  support staff and technical core are interrelated and serve more then one function.(Daft 2007 p27) The company structure of Cathay Pacific is not a complex one. The head of the organization is the chairperson this case it is Chris Pratt he joined the company in 1978. Then is the Tony Tyler the executive director. He directly reports to the chairpersonAll heads of the all the departments report reports directly to both the chair person and the executive director. John Slosar is the Chief Operating Officer he is the head of the most important department which is the operations departmentAfter the operations department the next important department is the Corporate Development department. The head of this department is Ian Shiu,The next important department is the Finance department. The director of this department is James E. Hughes-HallettThe next most important department is the Flight Operations department Nick Rhodes is the director of this department. The next most important department is the Sales and Marketing Department. James Barrington is the head of this Department. The next most important department is the Personnel department. The head of this department is William Chau. The next most important department is the Information Management department. Edward Nicol is the head of this department. The next important department is the Cargo Department. Rupert Hogg is the director of this department. Another important department is the corporate Affairs department. Quince Chong is the head of this department. Yet another important department is the service delivery department Ivan Chu is the head of this department. Last but not least is eth engraining department. The head of this department  is Christopher Gibbs References Ashok Ranchhod (2003); CIM Coursebooks 2002-2003 Diploma Case Study Book: Analysis and Decision (CIM Workbooks 2003/04) Butterworth-Heinemann; Revised edition p110Chan D (2000); Air wars in Asia: competitive and collaborative strategies and tactics in action Journal of Management Development , Vol 19 : 6 Pp473 488Daft, B.L. (2007); Organisation Theory and Design, 9th. Ed., South-Western p27Gavin Young (1988) ;Beyond Lion Rock: The Story of Cathay Pacific Airways Hutchinson Radius.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Medieval Outlook on the Bubonic Plague Essay -- Biology Medical Biomed

The Medieval Outlook on the Bubonic Plague The Black Death was a major factor in the history of Europe as well as the history of the world. Rivaling the effects of an immense bioterrorist attack, the Black Death was responsible for the taking of over 25 million lives. Creating economic, societal, and medical changes, the Black Death forced Europe to essentially recreate its entire groundwork. At the time of the Black Death, medicine remained very archaic, and European society scrambled to find a cure to this mysterious disease. This study ponders the effects of medieval methods of treatment on this once ravaging disease. The Middle Ages was a dark time for the people of Europe. As the Black Death reigned during the mid-14nth century, dead bodies littered the streets, social order was abandoned, and human pretenses were forgotten. This deadly disease resulted in a complete alteration in the foundations of Europe itself. Unique practices, myths, and beliefs manifested themselves in the people?causing them to doubt the very church and government which had once captured their undoubting faith. Despite the scrambling of both doctors and church officials, there seemed no end to the enormous death tolls. The plague, feared and dreaded by all, changed the behavior of an entire continent and resulted, ultimately, in the death of a third of its population. European society did not understand the disease?partly because the plague itself changed form?and thus strove to find a cure. Two main types of plague predominated in the time of the Black Death?the bubonic and the pneumonic. Both types of diseases are caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis but vary in methods of transmission . Although the bubonic plague is not contagious and can o... ...sease. The medieval outlook on the plague, mingled with feelings of hysteria and greed, was a fearful one. Bibliography 1.Historical Blood Beliefs. Medical Blood. July 20, 2005: ttp:\www2.kenyon.edu/Depts?WMNS/Project/Wmns36/bloodli/medframe.htm Medieval Outlook on the Bubonic Plague 6 2.Jarret C. et al Transmisson of Yersinia Pestis from an infectious biofilm in the flea vector. Journal of Infectious Disease (2004) v 190 I4 p783 3.Stevenson, J. (2004, Sept.). Impact of Infectious Diseases on Development of Human Societies. MBI. July 18, 2005: http://cas/muohio.edu/`stevenjr/mbi111/impact111.html. 4.The Black Death. The History of Bubonic Plague. December 2, 2003: http://dpalm.med.uth.tmc.edu/courses/BT2003/BTstudents2003_files%5CPlague2003.htm 5. Persecution of Jews. Europe in the Late Middle Ages: Ages.http://history.boisestate.edu/hy309/Plague/17.html

Tuesday, January 14, 2020

Case Study: Organisational Development Essay

As a means of accurately comprehending the issues in this case it is essential that analysis takes place using a range of managerial perspectives in relation to the implementation of change in order to understand the deficiencies in BA management’s implementation of change. A classical Organisational Development (OD) approach is focuses on changing attitudes and behaviour whereas in this case focus was solely upon improving effectiveness of organisation. According to this perspective BA disregarded several key steps in implementing this change as no feedback was gathered from staff. The OD practitioners in this case have ineffective intrapersonal and interpersonal skills as management have failed to gain the trust of its employees and do not display personal integrity. In relation to a sense making perspective BA did not understand that the change they intended to implement needed to have plausibility in the eyes of employees. Hence management’s approach to abandon talks over the introduction of smart cards and announce their forced implementation at just five days notice [ (Palmer, Dunford and Akin 2009) ]. BA did not effectively convey to positive plausible aspects of this change as employees still thought that the system would be used to make staff alter their working hours at little notice [ (Palmer, Dunford and Akin 2009) ]. Common to various change management approaches are that they highlight the need for communication to be not just about passing on information but allowing different voices to be heard. BA by abandoning talks with unions and employees and also in the lack of provision of appropriate information to their American customers during the strike demonstrates an inherent incapability of BA management to convey information effectively [ (Palmer, Dunford and Akin 2009) ]. Also apparent in this case is the lacking of one strong leader of multiple leaders not one person in BA’s management structure took control of the situation and it seems that BA management participated in groupthink to the detriment of the organisation namely its loss of 40 million pounds. According to this perspective it is argued that the style of change will depend on the scale of change and the receptivity of organisational members [ (Palmer, Dunford and Akin 2009) ]. In the case of BA the style of change was not matched to the needs of the organisation. The situation called for a collaborative style of change drawing upon input from a range of sources including employees, unions and management but instead drew upon a coercive approach thus adding further fuel to an already flamed situation, the layoff of 13000 employees. Viewing this case from a processual perspective this approach highlights a number of stages in engaging in the management of change. The third stage of this approach involves gaining acknowledgement and understanding of the importance of the problem. In relation to the BA case study example BA management fail to effectively understand the problem at hand, instead they made the choice to ignore underlying cultural issues within the organisation and proceed ahead with what they considered as the best course of action from an efficiency perspective. Evidence is found through CEO Rod Eddington’s comment that he was unaware that there was even a respect deficit to be plugged [ (Palmer, Dunford and Akin 2009) ]. In order to address the issues relating to the implementation of change in this case analysis of why BA has failed should take place. In doing this BA management should attempt to understand why their method of implementing change failed from a range of perspectives. From this BA can develop new strategies for implementing change for example using a particular change management perspective and moulding it to fit the needs of the organisation. A solution to the problem encountered by BA in this case would be to be more proactive in their change management strategies. If BA are continuously working toward change making use of employee opinions and feedback within the organisation, large scale changes such as the implementation of smart card technologies in this circumstance would encounter less resistance to change as BA would gain the trust and support of its employees due to their participation in the design and implementation of change within the organisation. In conclusion it can be identified that BA in this case have managed their implementation of change very poorly from analysis of a range of approaches relating to implementation of change and it is proposed that BA being more proactive and making use of a participative approach would be beneficial to the continued organisational development of this business. Bibliography Palmer, Ian, Richard Dunford, and Gib Akin. Managing Organizational Change: A Multiple Perspectives Approach. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2009.

Monday, January 6, 2020

My Personal Experience with Contracts - 825 Words

A contract is a legal agreement in which two or more parties agree to a trade of goods and/or services through a bilateral or unilateral exchange. People are constantly entering into contracts, and while both parties usually fulfill them, there are instances in which one or more of the parties renege and there is a breach of contract. In order for a contract to be legally enforceable there must be five key elements that are fulfilled: offer, acceptance, mutuality of obligation, consideration, and competency. While I have entered into several contracts throughout my life, there is one in particular that did not have the results I expected, which ultimately resulted in a breach. In order for a contract to be enforceable there must first be an offer, which can be defined as an expression of willingness to contract on certain terms, made with the intention that [the terms] shall become binding as soon as it is accepted by the person to whom it is addressed (Treitel, 2007). While statione d in Germany, I saw an advertisement in which Coralis Harper Oil Painting Services was offering to transform photographs into oil paintings on canvas in a variety of sizes. Based on the services being offered by Coralis Harper, the owner of the company, I believed that she was qualified to transform an original photograph of my son and daughter into an oil painting on a 24x30 inch canvas. Based on the terms outlined by Coralis Harper, I erroneously believed that we had fulfilled theShow MoreRelatedMy Personal Code Of Ethic969 Words   |  4 PagesMy Personal Code of Ethic Personal ethic is what a person believes about morality and right and wrong. Ethic should and can give real and practical guidance to our lives: gives our best rational interests and without sacrificing others. My family, friends, and education have played profound roles in the development of my personal ethic: conscience, personal integrity, responsibility, and egalitarianism. 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